App Review: Khan Academy Kids

Were you wondering if the new app, Khan Academy Kids, lives up to the hype? I'm here to tell you it does.

It's rare these days to find an app that's free, no strings attached. Khan Kids just happens to be one of those diamonds in the rough, though. There's no cost to download, no in-app purchases, no commercials, no products pushed. To tell you the truth, it's refreshing.

Khan Academy is a non-profit, self-proclaimed "global classroom" providing educational resources for all ages. Each curriculum is developed by qualified content specialists. Subjects cover calculus to art history, electrical engineering to grammar, SAT prep to computer programming.

Their high-quality educational app found a multitude of ways to make learning fun for children ages 2 to 5. Five colorful animals help your children explore letter knowledge and sounds, writing, reading, logic, math and science through games, books, videos and painting. Hiding inside the activities are tricks to help your child with soft skills such as empathy, flexible thinking and memory.

The games are great, but I love the super cute animal books and leveled readers. There's even a module about the jobs of an author and illustrator. Be still my librarian heart!

The only "payment" needed is a parent's email address. Khan Academy Kids is found on both Android and Apple platforms for free. As of publication, Android's version is still in beta testing.

*Remember, as with all media, it's best if you and your child play together. The American Pediatrics Association recommends that children ages 2 to 5 have a trusted adult to relate what they're seeing to the world around them. They also suggest that screen time be limited to one hour a day for this age group. For more information, take a look at their recommendations for media usage.

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