I Have Stories to Tell

When a child understands the construction of stories, they'll be able to comprehend more when they begin to read.

Below are fun ways to begin working on storytelling, narrative skills and comprehension.


Even though it doesn't look like it, your active toddler is listening to what you say. Confidence Meets Parenting shows how easy it is to tell a story that is relatable to even the most active children.


There are many ways to tell a story, and your child may work better with one type versus another. Childhood Beckons has tips for telling stories using illustrations with the whole family.


Let your child's imagination out of the box to tell stories while you write them down. Carrots Are Orange explains that this practice not only fosters storytelling, but works on making your child aware of print and writing. Plus, they make for excellent keepsakes.


Make your own set of story dice! This activity from Frog in a Pocket is so easy! All you really need are some wooden dice and pictures from a magazine (or hand drawn). They're a low-cost version of Rory's Story Cubes.


I really like this simple printable from Kitchen Counter Chronicles. Cut out the strips and place them in a jar/hat/bowl. Pull one out and tell a story! You could even make your own strips.


Build a story in the car! How Stuff Works has a road trip game that uses team work and imagination to create a memorable drive.


What kind of stories does your child like to tell?

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