Technology: Blast from the Past


With technology constantly moving forward, it’s easy to forget about all those once invaluable old technology gadgets you’ve left behind in favor of the new wave of technology.

We typically don’t get rid of the old tech; some of it sits around the house or office gathering dust, while other items are used in a more limited fashion. Surprisingly, some pieces of tech are still in use or are making a comeback. Why do we still use faxes, calculators and pagers? Read on for answers.


Pagers:

Privacy, urgency, cost effectiveness, and reliability are the main reasons pagers are used today. This is why nearly 80% of hospitals still rely on pagers for critical communication.  

Polaroid: 

The handheld camera that dominated the markets in the 20th century recently started regaining popularity. The whir of the camera after taking the picture and tangible nostalgic picture you get almost instantly are reasons why people are still buying them. 

Checks:

Checks are still a great way to pay in certain instances, such as when you want a paper trail confirming your payment, dealing with an individual who doesn’t have easy access to digital payment methods, or a business that doesn’t accept credit cards.  

Dictaphones: 

The Dictaphone is seen as more reliable than other options. It doesn’t stop recording when you take a call, it’s easier to transcribe, and it doesn’t do that heart-stopping thing where you hit “save” and your file disappears into the Cloud.   

Calculators: 

Today, 90% of teachers in the U.S. still use handheld calculators like the TI-84 as their primary math tool in the classroom.  

Maps: 

In this rapidly evolving digital world, paper maps add a sense of permanence. No signal? No problem. No battery required either. 

Dumb phones:

Their low costs, battery life, durability, and convenience are why they are still used today, particularly in India, the Middle East and Africa. 

Faxes:

Faxing is more secure, easier to use, and has accessibility better suited to existing work habits than computer-based messaging. 


What old technology do you still find useful? Tell us in the comments.

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