Compounded Interest

It's easy to help your child learn when you foster the interests they already have. They will be more likely to interact with you and their attention will be focused for longer.

Talk about a topic they already love! This will also let them know that you care about their interests and help develop a sense of security when they're with you.

How do you help them find their niche? Let's hear from some experts:


Use them to your advantage! The National Association for the Education of Young Children encourages working your child's interests into everyday lessons on science, math, language and art.


Talk to your child about what they love to improve their communication skills! The Hanen Centre has steps to get the most out of a conversation with your child.


Childhood 101 reminds us children do have interests, no matter how old they are. Is your toddler really excited about running? Does your baby reach for a certain toy? Are your children constantly chasing the cat?

Where to start? Sleeping Should Be Easy has your back.


When your child has a disability, there's a lot of focus on what they can't do. Smart Kids with Learning Disabilities encourages parents to look for clues to your child's strengths. This information can apply to neurotypical children, too.


Lane Kids has tips for parents when children are exploring their interests.

What is your child currently interested in? Has it changed recently? What do you do to encourage them?

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